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microfluidics

The firm's microfluidic diagnostic system uses phenotypic bacteria growth analysis to enable rapid antibiotic testing and treatment of sepsis patients.

To combat the challenge of counterfeit diagnostic tests, IBM scientists have developed a method to embed security codes to authenticate diagnostic tests.

The researchers have prospectively validated a disposable cartridge-based microfluidic assay by obtaining results using fine-needle aspirates in 40 patients.

Formerly known as SlipChip Corp, the firm has recently won nearly $10 million in funding to hone its approaches to sepsis and CT/NG testing.

The funding totals up to $5.6 million over five years and will incorporate Talis' proprietary SlipChip technology.

The startup's technology uses a droplet microfluidics approach for cell isolation and phenotypic detection, and is being targeted for use by hospitals.

Inspired by the electronic breadboards used to prototype electronic devices, the system is meant to enable flexible and inexpensive design of clinical tests.

The device uses neutrophil movement and its correlation with infection to detect sepsis. A commercial version could be several years away, however.

The firm aims to have its test on the European clinical market by early next year, followed by a launch in the US.

According to project organizers, feasibility testing in the first phase of the project was successful and clinical trials are planned for later this year.

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