microfluidics

With several SBIR grants from the NIH, the firm is also using its Liquid Scan platform to identify neonatal trophoblast cells in maternal blood samples.

Its platform is being developed for several medical conditions using separate modules to measure cells, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and small molecules.

The funding totals up to $5.6 million over five years and will incorporate Talis' proprietary SlipChip technology.

The startup's technology uses a droplet microfluidics approach for cell isolation and phenotypic detection, and is being targeted for use by hospitals.

Inspired by the electronic breadboards used to prototype electronic devices, the system is meant to enable flexible and inexpensive design of clinical tests.

According to project organizers, feasibility testing in the first phase of the project was successful and clinical trials are planned for later this year.

The test would also be used to detect antibiotic susceptibility. Fraunhofer received £900,000 from SBRI Healthcare in support of the project to develop the test.

The device consists of a reservoir that enables the analyte to contact only the top of a screen-printed electrode, increasing sensitivity.

According to CEO Eugene Chan, the CE designation is just the first of more to come, as the company enters the diagnostics market with a focus on hematological testing.

The company offers the FDA-cleared Trak Male Fertility Testing System, an at-home test that allows men to learn more about their sperm count level.

Pages