February 14, 2019
Sponsored by
Oxford Nanopore Technologies

Transcriptome of an Agricultural Pest Delineated by Oxford Nanopore RNA-Seq

Genome Webinar

PhD Candidate, Department of Human Genetics
McGill University, Canada

This webinar will describe a project that applied Oxford Nanopore long-read RNA-seq to explore the transcriptional landscape of a damaging agricultural pest.

Anthony Bayega of McGill University will discuss the study, which looked at the transcriptional dynamics that occur during early embryo development of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), a key pest of cultivated olive trees that costs the olive fruits industry an estimated $200 million annually.

Anthony and colleagues combined absolute gene quantification using internal RNA spikes, full-length cDNA sequencing using Oxford Nanopore long-read RNA-seq, and high-resolution timescale experimentation for the study. They generated a de novo transcriptome assembly and identified 3,553 novel genes and a total of 79,810 transcripts.

Dr. Bayega will discuss how he and his team also refined gene models for key sex-determining genes, which might provide insights into biological control of this fly.

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