Close Menu

GenomeWebinars

Tue
Apr
23
1:00 pm2019
Sponsored by
N-of-One

AMP/ACMG/CAP Cancer Sequence Variant Guidelines: A Two-Year Status Report

Genome Webinar

Clinical Director, Molecular Tumor Board & Medical Director, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Inova Medical Group

Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

Chief Scientific Officer, N-of-One, a Qiagen Company

In 2016, the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), in partnership with the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and American College of Molecular Genetics (ACMG), launched a set of guidelines meant to set industry standards for reporting of molecular diagnostic test results in oncology, using a tier-based system and defined levels of evidence. Upon the release of these guidelines, several laboratories and molecular diagnostic decision-support companies incorporated them into their reporting to give pathologists and treating oncologists a more consistent report format that clearly conveys the level of importance and evidence for each variant, enabling them to provide the most relevant treatment options for oncology patients.

In this webinar, Dr. Timothy Cannon, Medical Director for Gastrointestinal Cancers at Inova Medical Group, Dr. Marilyn Li, Vice Chief of the Division of Genomic Diagnostics at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Dr. Sheryl Elkin, CSO of N-of-One, a Qiagen company, will discuss adoption of the guidelines in the field to date, what’s working, and any new challenges/opportunities that have come from the initial launch.

Attendees can expect to learn about some of the complexities that exist in incorporating the AMP guidelines into treatment strategies, as well as what might be on the horizon in industry standardization for levels of evidence. The webinar will conclude with an opportunity for audience Q&A.

Sponsored by
Wed
Apr
24
11:00 am2019
Sponsored by
Biocrates

Metabolomics Analyses to Elucidate Systemic Processes in Human Health and Disease

Genome Webinar

Head of the Genome Analysis Center, Head of Molecular Endocrinology; Helmholtz Center Munich

This webinar will provide a wide-ranging overview of the promise for metabolomics in studying human health and disease, as well as its potential for integration with other -omics disciplines.

Our speaker, Dr. Jerzy Adamski of the Helmholtz Center Munich, will review current approaches in targeted and non-targeted metabolomics, highlighting differences in methodology, coverage, advantages, and disadvantages of either approach. 

This webinar will put a special emphasis on the universal applications of broad targeted metabolomics assays, which have shown promise in delineating factors contributing to the clinical phenotype, including intrinsic and environment-related processes. Dr. Adamski will also touch upon the benefits of calculating metabolite sums and ratios along the most important metabolic pathways.

The acknowledgement of the importance of host-microbiota interaction warrants a look at how metabolomics can help this rather young research field move beyond associations between disease risk and microbial genetics, and towards a more thorough functional understanding of the involved processes. For this purpose, Dr. Adamski will highlight selected metabolic pathways that are known to be associated with gut microbiota and affect health via direct metabolic and immune-related effects.

Finally, Dr. Adamski will discuss how metabolomics can integrate with other -omics technologies, providing examples of how metabolomics has enhanced genome-wide association studies, among others.

Sponsored by

Bioinformatician, Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh

This webinar will discuss novel long-read transcript sequencing (LRTseq) methods for transcriptome annotation that could increase the efficiency and accuracy of future sequencing projects.

LRTseq technologies, such as Pacific Biosciences’ Iso-Seq and Oxford Nanopore’s cDNA sequencing, have the power to provide rapid high-quality de novo transcriptome annotations. However, standard cDNA library preparation methods for LRTseq capture a significant amount of degraded RNA and are often overpopulated with highly expressed genes.

Degraded RNA reduces the efficiency of sequencing and introduces uncertainty with respect to predicted transcription start sites. Highly expressed genes can dominate LRTseq data, resulting in a loss of coverage for lower expressed genes. This typically results in missing genes and alternative transcripts in the final genome annotation.

In this webinar, Richard Kuo of the Roslin Institute will discuss how his team addressed RNA degradation by using Lexogen’s cap-specific TeloPrime method to prepare full-length cDNA libraries. To reduce overabundant genes, Kuo and colleagues experimented with two methods of cDNA normalization.

He will present his team’s results using these novel methods of cDNA preparation for Iso-Seq sequencing and will also cover some basics of LRTseq and analysis pipelines for Iso-Seq (from raw data to transcriptome annotation). 

Sponsored by

Clinical Microbiologist,
Ikazia Hospital

This webinar will discuss the implementation of a rapid 24/7 PCR service in a small urban hospital setting.

Modern PCR technologies are changing the workflow of medical microbiology laboratories, making it possible to get molecular test results within an hour instead of days to weeks. Smaller and cheaper analyzers also make multiplex PCR techniques possible for smaller laboratories without a molecular department.

This webinar will illustrate the impact of new PCR technologies in the hospital setting. Our speaker, Michiel van Rijn, is a clinical microbiologist and head of the Department of Clinical Microbiology at the Ikazia Hospital in Rotterdam. Although the Ikazia hospital is one of the smaller hospitals in Rotterdam (360 beds), it has offered a "24/7" PCR service to its medical staff for 10 years, starting with molecular screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 2009. The hospital has expanded its portfolio in the last decade, and most recently rolled out multiplex syndromic testing in 2018.

In this webinar, Dr. van Rijn will speak about the implementation of a rapid 24/7 PCR service in his hospital and the effects of this service on patient outcomes and clinical decision making strategies. In particular, he will share his experiences with QIAstat-Dx syndromic testing and his expectation of further use of this technique in the future.

QIAstat-Dx is coming soon. Currently available as DiagCORE. DiagCORE is not available in all countries.

Sponsored by

Medical Oncologist, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center

Director of the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, German Heart Center of the Technical University

This webinar will present recent evidence that demonstrates how incorporating circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) assessments into real-world patient management can influence patient care decisions, alter radiographic interpretations, and impact clinical outcomes.

In particular, this webinar will discuss OncoBEAM a ctDNA testing method based on BEAMing (Beads, Emulsion, Amplification, Magnetics) technology developed at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. OncoBEAM provides highly sensitive mutation analysis for the accurate and reliable detection of rare tumor-derived DNA present in the blood of patients with cancer.

In this webinar, Dr. Evan Lipson of Johns Hopkins will share his experience on the clinical utility of ctDNA measurements as an adjunct to radiographic imaging for monitoring disease activity in advanced melanoma patients undergoing treatment with targeted therapy or immune checkpoint inhibitors. These results have important implications for the clinical management of patients receiving immunotherapy and demonstrate the value of performing ctDNA testing for better resolution of tumor activity when performed alongside routine imaging and clinical assessments.

Next, Dr. Stefan Holdenrieder of the Technical University of Munich will examine the value of KRAS-mutant ctDNA as a highly specific marker for early response prediction and treatment monitoring of advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The discussion will focus on the potential clinical benefit of monitoring changes in ctDNA levels in response to therapy, which appear more pronounced and rapid than changes in established protein biomarkers.

Sponsored by
Wed
May
15
11:00 am2019
Sponsored by
Thermo Fisher Scientific

Discovery of Exon-Level CNVs in Daily Practice for Constitutional Genome Testing

Genome Webinar

Team Leader, Intellectual Disability & Congenital Anomalies, Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center

This webinar will discuss how Radboud University Medical Center’s Department of Human Genetics is using exon-level copy number variant (CNV) detection by microarray to assist its efforts in constitutional genome diagnostics. 

Nicole de Leeuw of Radboud University Medical Center will share how CytoScan XON, a high-sensitivity exon-level microarray, compares with CytoScan HD in constitutional cytogenomics, in both prenatal and postnatal samples from patients with congenital anomalies and/or neurodevelopmental delay.

This webinar will share data supporting the use of CytoScan XON to test multiple genes for intragenic CNVs in the human genome and will demonstrate how the CytoScan XON yields good array test results with DNA samples from a variety of tissues of origin.

For Research Use Only. Not For Use In Diagnostic Procedures.

Sponsored by
Thu
May
16
1:00 pm2019
Sponsored by
PerkinElmer

A Comprehensive Workflow for Soil Metagenomics Analysis Using Shotgun Sequencing

Genome Webinar

Scientist, R&D Department, Illumina

This webinar will discuss a comprehensive end-to-end workflow for soil metagenomic shotgun sequencing that offers an unbiased alternative to amplicon-based approaches to assess the composition of culture-free microbial communities and predict functional profiles. 

The soil microbiome represents a highly diverse and complex microbial community that contributes to many aspects of human, animal and environmental health. Due to the biodiversity of soil microbial communities and the presence of various PCR and library preparation inhibitors, such as humic substances, unbiased extraction of high-quality DNA for NGS has been challenging for soil metagenomic studies.

This webinar will focus on the following topics:

  • Utility of shotgun sequencing using culture-free soil samples
  • Validated methodologies for gDNA extraction, library preparation, and sequencing
  • User-friendly analytical pipeline for taxonomic classification, alpha-diversity measurements, hierarchical clustering, and functional potential

Due to the location of our speaker, this webinar will be pre-recorded. You may submit questions in advance of the webinar via the registration page.

Sponsored by

Senior Specialist Biomedical Scientist, Frontier Pathology

Specialist Biomedical Scientist, Frontier Pathology

Specialist Biomedical Scientist, Frontier Pathology

This webinar will provide a first-hand look at how a hematology/oncology lab in the UK set up and validated three molecular assays for routine in-house use.

Speakers from the Royal Sussex County Hospital (RSCH) laboratory, operated under the Frontier Pathology NHS Partnership, will share their experience implementing two assays for suspected BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

The RSCH lab has spent the last several years repatriating historical send-away hemato-oncology assays for JAK2 V617F and CALR exon 9. During this webinar, RSCH scientists Munyoro Guvamatanga, Anna Tarasewicz, and Rebecca Lough will share their experiences bringing these assays in-house.

The JAK2 V617F mutation assay was the first to be repatriated in 2015 and is performed using the CE-IVD marked ipsogen JAK2 RGQ PCR kit. More recently, the lab began detecting CALR exon 9 mutations using the CE-IVD marked ipsogen CALR RGQ PCR kit. The assays are performed using gDNA extracted from whole blood samples and subsequent real-time qPCR on the QIAGEN Rotor Gene Q MDx 5Plex HRM platform.

This webinar will describe the experiences and challenges associated with the setup and validation/verification of the assays in the RSCH laboratory.

Sponsored by

R&D Manager, ID-Solutions

VP of Commercial Operations, Stilla Technologies

This webinar will outline the entire liquid biopsy workflow from cell-free DNA isolation to mutation detection by Crystal Digital PCR with the Naica System from Stilla Technologies.

Our speakers will focus on detecting EGFR, BRAF, NRAS, and KRAS mutations as well as pediatric and adult cerebral tumor classification panels.

Attendees of this webinar will:

  • Understand the liquid biopsy process for EGFR, BRAF, NRAS, and KRAS mutations;
  • Learn about the benefits of the Crystal Digital PCR platform in combination with research-use-only kits;
  • Hear why digital PCR is a particularly useful technique for the detection of mutations, therapeutic monitoring, and resistance appearance;
  • Learn about the different steps of the liquid biopsy workflow, from DNA isolation to DNA quantification and qualification and DNA genotyping, with dPCR multiplex kits

Director of Genomics and Genome Informatics,
Scripps Research Translational Institute

This webinar will provide an overview of polygenic risk scores, which aggregate dozens of genetic variants that have been linked to disease risk in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) into a single score.

Recently there has been growing interest in polygenic risk scores for predicting disease risk, expanding on the value of large GWAS. Various efforts have begun to demonstrate the utility of polygenic risk profiling to identify groups of individuals who could benefit from the knowledge of their probabilistic susceptibility to disease.

This talk will review the evidence supporting the personal and clinical utility of polygenic risk profiling and how it can be transformative for clinical care as well as drug discovery.

More specifically this webinar will:

• Describe the polygenic basis for common diseases.

• Describe how polygenic risk scores are generated. What are the various strategies?

• The utility of polygenic risk scores from multiple perspectives.

• Discuss “Genotype First” as a framework for the ethical use of genetics.

Recent GenomeWebinars
Wed
Apr
17
1:00 pm2019
Sponsored by
Isoplexis

Biomarker Strategies for Optimizing Checkpoint Immunotherapy Treatment

Genome Webinar

Associate Professor, Department of Leukemia, MD Anderson Cancer Center

Director, New Collaborations, Isoplexis

This webinar provides an overview of current biomarker strategies for guiding the use of combination checkpoint immunotherapies in blood cancers.

Checkpoint immunotherapy has proven to be a powerful therapeutic against a variety of cancers, yet due to response rates that range between 20 percent and 40 percent, researchers and drug developers continue to seek ways to indicate response or non-response as early as possible. A particular area of focus is biomarkers that can assess the status of the pre-therapy tumor microenvironment in order to predict response.

Our speaker, Naval Daver of MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses advanced immune-based approaches in acute myeloid leukemia that combine chemotherapy with checkpoint therapy, along with the relevant biomarker strategies associated with each.

Dr. Daver also describes a study based on a single-cell cytokine analysis system and Polyfunctional Strength Index (PSI) from Isoplexis that demonstrated that certain cytokine potency contributors, in particular from stimulatory cytokines, correlate with overall survival.

In addition, Jon Chen of Isoplexis shares several case studies using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in combination checkpoint immunotherapy that correlate polyfunction to outcome.

*Due to the location of our speakers, this webinar is pre-recorded.

Sponsored by

Director, Penn State Institute for Personalized Medicine

Director of Customer Solutions and Applications, Bionano Genomics

This webinar reviews a recent study that applied whole-genome sequencing and optical genome mapping to identify a large number of previously undetected somatic structural variants in leukemia samples. 

Genomic analysis has driven major advances in leukemia, where the spectrum of driver mutations provides a much more rigorous classification of disease subtypes, with a correspondingly more robust prognostic power, than previous histological characterization.

In this webinar, Dr. James Broach, Director of the Penn State Institute for Personalized Medicine, discusses a study that indicates there are far more structural variants in leukemia than previously thought.

Dr. Broach and his team combined whole-genome sequencing and optical genome mapping to a number of adult and pediatric leukemia samples. The method identified 97 percent of the structural variants previously reported by karyotype analysis of these samples, as well as an additional fivefold more such somatic rearrangements. 

The method identified on average tens of previously unrecognizable inversions and duplications and hundreds of previously unrecognizable insertions and deletions. These structural variants affected a number of leukemia-associated genes as well as cancer driver genes not previously associated with leukemia and genes not previously associated with cancer. Analysis indicates that the status of several of the recurrently mutated genes identified in this study significantly affect survival of AML patients.

Dr. Broach discusses the implications of the findings, which suggest that current genomic analysis methods fail to identify a majority of structural variants in leukemia samples — an omission that may hamper diagnostic and prognostic efforts.

Sponsored by

Member of the Molecular Cardiogenetic Laboratory, Hospices Civils de Lyon, France

 

Clinical Application Product Manager, Sophia Genetics

This webinar will present the utility of a personalized in silico analytical approach for the routine clinical diagnosis of channelopathies and cardiomyopathies.

The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has greatly improved the ability to rapidly assess many genes at the same time, but the analysis and interpretation of complex genomic variants still remains a challenge. In order for NGS to find use in routine diagnostics, clinical laboratories must be able to overcome this complexity and enable better outcomes for patients.

Dr. Alexandre Janin, member of the molecular cardiogenetic lab at Hospices Civils de Lyon in France, has solved this complexity and successfully characterized difficult variants by adopting the Sophia Platform.

Dr. Janin will discuss how the platform:

  • Enables fast and comprehensive analysis;
  • Detects copy number variations quickly and efficiently;
  • Facilitates variant interpretation by sharing knowledge among members of the national network for Hereditary Cardiac Diseases (Cardiogen)

Dr. Janin will be joined by Dr. Audrey Coiffic, Clinical Application Product Manager at Sophia Genetics, who will discuss the most recent developments in targeted solutions for the advanced detection of inherited cardiac diseases.

Sponsored by

Research Associate, Institute of Medical Genetics, Cardiff University

Senior Software Developer and Analyst, Institute of Medical Genetics, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK

The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) is a manually curated, comprehensive collection of disease-causing, germline mutations. Since 1996, a team of experts has manually catalogued over a quarter of a million mutations for the database.  

This talk will feature a retrospective view of HGMD, how it has grown over time, and the research that it has enabled. In particular, our speakers will talk about how HGMD has helped move precision medicine forward by providing translational research and diagnostic applications with the most comprehensive survey of literature on genetic mutations responsible for human inherited diseases, supporting standardized interpretation for germline diseases. 

Sponsored by
Wed
Mar
27
12:00 pm2019
Sponsored by
Swift Biosciences

How One NGS Core Lab Reduced Sequencing Costs with a Novel Library Normalization Kit

Genome Webinar

Senior NGS Specialist, UCL Genomics

Product Manager, Swift Biosciences

Sequencing workflows require library quantification and normalization to ensure data quality and reduce cost. Traditionally, prior to sequencing, next-generation sequencing library technicians and automation strategies have had to undertake numerous steps to quantify and normalize NGS libraries.

In this webinar, Tony Brooks, Senior NGS Specialist at University College London Genomics, discusses how his core facility implemented the Swift Normalase Kit, a novel enzymatic library normalization product that streamlines the cumbersome steps following NGS library preparation. 

Compared to conventional normalization, Swift Normalase saves sequencing costs by reducing read depth variation within a pool from a typical CV of 10-25% to a CV <10%. With a simple bead-free, quantification-free, two-step workflow, Normalase enables bulk processing of samples and expedites library pooling and loading to save time and cost.

Tony shares how his lab used the Swift Normalase kit for RNAseq library normalization to improve his facility's sequencing workflow and to reduce cost.

Sponsored by
Tue
Mar
26
11:00 am2019
Sponsored by
PerkinElmer

Advancing Agricultural Genomics with Low-Cost NGS Genotyping

Genome Webinar

Director and Founder, Texas A&M AgriLife Genomics and Bioinformatics Service

This webinar addresses the current status and future directions for massively high-throughput genomics for plant and animal breeding and research.

A major drawback to sequencing-based agriculture studies has been the cost. Arrays and reduced representation sequencing methods are common alternatives for genotyping, but each of these methods has significant limitations associated with it.  

In this webinar, Charles Johnson, founder of the Texas A&M AgriLife Genomics and Bioinformatics Service, shares how his team developed a new approach, called AgSeq, to address these shortcomings.

AgSeq is a novel agriculture-focused genotyping pipeline that uses optimized laboratory processing, massive sample multiplexing, and machine learning to obtain highly accurate genotype information from low-coverage sequencing data. The reduced cost of whole-genome sequencing afforded by AgSeq allows for a substantial increase in individuals genotyped per study. AgSeq is powered by optimized library prep, automation, and high-throughput sequencing coupled with a reduction in the amount of data needed per individual. Data from individual samples is used to accurately impute gaps resulting from reduced coverage, allowing for accurate genotyping of large populations for plant and animal studies.  

Sponsored by

Professor of Bioinformatics, Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida

This webinar provides a comparison of next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches for human transcriptome sequencing, including short-read Illumina sequencing and synthetic long-read sequencing technology.
 
NGS is a powerful method for characterizing eukaryotic gene expression. While short-read transcriptome sequencing data is inexpensive, it has major shortcomings, including difficulty detecting isoforms and gene fusions, trouble discriminating paralogous sequences, and difficulties in phasing alleles. Long-read sequencing such as PacBio Iso-Seq, meanwhile, offers long reads but at increased cost, higher error rates, and reduced quantification abilities.
 
Another approach, LoopSeq synthetic long-read sequencing technology from Loop Genomics, uses unique molecular identifiers to generate synthetic long reads on short-read Illumina sequencing instruments and no additional hardware. This method offers a promising option for human transcriptome sequencing by providing full-length mRNA sequencing coupled with UMI-based transcript counting for gene expression quantification.
 
In this webinar, Ana Conesa, Professor of Bioinformatics at the University of Florida, discusses a comparison study of short-read Illumina transcriptome sequencing and LoopSeq Transcriptome sequencing data for human transcriptome studies.

This is the second Loop Genomics GenomeWebinar on the topic of long-read versus short-read sequencing approaches. The first, which compared these methods in the context of microbiome sequencing, is available on demand here.

Sponsored by

Director of Research and Clinical Trials, Tricore Reference Laboratories

This webinar discusses how a new multiplexed testing system can help physicians rapidly diagnose acute respiratory infections in the near-patient setting.

Acute respiratory tract infections are caused by a wide range of viral and bacterial pathogens and may share similar clinical presentations that make it difficult for physicians to diagnose based on symptoms alone. Syndromic testing with multiplex molecular panels offers clinical labs a way to quickly distinguish between a broad array of respiratory pathogens.

Join Dr. Steve Young of Tricore Reference Laboratories as he presents a new technology for multiplexed respiratory testing in acutely ill patients. He shares data demonstrating the capabilities of syndromic respiratory testing as well as his impressions on the ease of doing comprehensive syndromic testing using the QIAstat-Dx solution*.

*coming soon

Sponsored by

Instructor of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin

Outbreaks of influenza infections are seasonal and can range from regional outbreaks to nationwide epidemics or even global pandemics. Mortality can range from 4 percent to 60 percent for at-risk patient populations, depending on the strain circulating in the environment. Rapid diagnostics can significantly improve patient care and control outbreaks by treating with antivirals and informing patients of proper precautions to reduce spread.

Over the past decade, there has been a large shift in diagnostic options, moving from cell culture to rapid point-of-care testing. Today, multiple CLIA-waved assays are approved and laboratory managers must decide which methods and assays are appropriate for their healthcare environment.

In this webinar, Dr. Faron will discuss current trends in influenza epidemiology, evaluate current FDA-cleared assays, and present the MCW team's findings on a recent time-of-motion study comparing three rapid influenza assays. Overall, these data should aid healthcare providers to improve and implement rapid influenza testing.

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology in Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

Knowledge of the interactions between B-cells, T-cells, and follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs) is important for understanding the main determinant of GC B-cell fates. Given the very complex mixture of GC B-cells undergoing several different transitional states, single-cell transcriptional analysis is an effective way to precisely tackle how mutations occurring in GC-derived B-cell lymphomas affect these states and eventually cause cell transformation.

In this webinar, Dr. Wendy Béguelin of Weill Cornell Medicine will discuss how she used the BD Rhapsody single-cell RNA-seq platform and YFP floxed reporter mouse models to study how lymphoma-associated mutations disrupt the immune system by affecting GC B-cell states, explaining the biology of initiation of low-grade follicular lymphoma.

For Research Use Only. Not for use in diagnostic or therapeutic procedures.

Tue
Feb
26
1:00 pm2019
Sponsored by
Advanced Cell Diagnostics

A Cellular and Molecular Phenotyping Pipeline for Target Characterization in FFPE Biobank Samples

Genome Webinar

Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, McMaster University 

Masters Candidate, McMaster University

This webinar demonstrates how a research team at the Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health at McMaster University developed a cellular and molecular phenotyping pipeline using archived samples of lung tissue derived from patients diagnosed with fibrotic interstitial lung disease. 

Dr. Kjetil Ask discusses how the clinically relevant tissues were obtained, clinically categorized and deidentified. He provides his perspective on the requirement of cross-disciplinary expertise and the associated technological platform required for the identification and quantification of cellular and molecular targets in fibrotic lung disease. Dr. Ask also discusses the potential application of this platform to pre-clinical models of lung disease. 

Megan Vierhout presents her research on the role of alternatively activated macrophages and endoplasmic reticulum stress in fibrotic lung disease. She shows specific examples of automated immunohistochemistry and associated in situ hybridization technology using ACD RNAScope and BaseScope assays to demonstrate molecular phenotyping and target identification. 

Sponsored by

COO, Gradalis

This webinar provides a first-hand look at how Gradalis, a clinical-stage immunotherapy developer, is using an information management solution from L7 to streamline its research, clinical, and manufacturing operations. 

Precision medicine and new classes of immunotherapy treatments, including cell and gene therapies, require a new category of "companion informatics" that automate and synchronize complex manufacturing, quality management, and treatment processes. L7’s Enterprise Science Platform (ESP) is a scientific information management solution that connects people, processes, lab instrumentation, and bioprocess equipment to simplify and optimize biologics research, manufacturing, and treatment. 

This case study showcases L7's ESP’s implementation at Gradalis, where hand-written batch records with manual calculations and ad hoc oversight were initially used for production, analysis, and reporting. 

The webinar demonstrates ESP's capabilities, including end-to-end visibility, control, compliance, quality management, and automation of an organization’s workflow. ESP interfaces with common lab instruments, bioprocess equipment, and software systems, bringing inventory management, product testing, environmental monitoring, and other quality systems into a single platform. 

Sponsored by
Thu
Feb
14
12:00 pm2019
Sponsored by
Oxford Nanopore Technologies

Transcriptome of an Agricultural Pest Delineated by Oxford Nanopore RNA-Seq

Genome Webinar

PhD Candidate, Department of Human Genetics
McGill University, Canada

This webinar describes a project that applied Oxford Nanopore long-read RNA-seq to explore the transcriptional landscape of a damaging agricultural pest.

Anthony Bayega of McGill University discusses the study, which looked at the transcriptional dynamics that occur during early embryo development of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), a key pest of cultivated olive trees that costs the olive fruits industry an estimated $200 million annually.

Anthony and colleagues combined absolute gene quantification using internal RNA spikes, full-length cDNA sequencing using Oxford Nanopore long-read RNA-seq, and high-resolution timescale experimentation for the study. They generated a de novo transcriptome assembly and identified 3,553 novel genes and a total of 79,810 transcripts.

Dr. Bayega discusses how he and his team also refined gene models for key sex-determining genes, which might provide insights into biological control of this fly.

Sponsored by

CEO, One Codex

This webinar provides a comparison of several next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches — including short-read 16S, whole-genome sequencing (WGS), and synthetic long-read sequencing technology — for use in microbiome research studies.

NGS is a powerful method for characterizing complex microbial mixtures, but both short-read 16S and WGS methods have their shortcomings. While short-read 16S data is inexpensive, it only enables family- or genus-level identification, is not comparable across different variable regions, and provides poor relative abundance estimation. WGS, meanwhile, offers more accurate relative abundance estimation and greater specificity, but at increased cost and complexity.

Another approach, LoopSeq synthetic long-read sequencing technology from Loop Genomics, offers an intermediate solution by providing species-level identification and significantly improved relative abundance estimation over short-read 16S data. LoopSeq uses unique molecular identifiers to generate synthetic long reads on short-read Illumina sequencing instruments. 

In this webinar, Nick Greenfield of One Codex discusses a comparison study of short-read 16S, WGS, and LoopSeq data for four samples – two known composition-positive controls, including a 20-organism bacterial mixture from ATCC, and two complex microbiome samples.

He shares details from this comparison as well as demonstrate how to analyze these datasets on the One Codex software platform.

This webinar is the first Loop Genomics GenomeWebinar on the topic of long-read versus short-read sequencing approaches. Part 2 will provide a comparison of (NGS) approaches for human transcriptome sequencing, including short-read Illumina sequencing and synthetic long-read sequencing technology. Register Here - Part 2.

Sponsored by