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Genome Webinar

Associate Director, Marie-Josée & Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Chief Technology Officer, Philips Genomics

This webinar presents an in-depth look at how Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has developed and implemented a next-generation sequencing panel for mutational tumor profiling of advanced cancer patients.

Michael Berger, Associate Director of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the implementation of MSK-IMPACT, an NGS panel that analyzes both tumor and matched normal tissue to detect protein-coding mutations, copy number alterations, and certain promoter mutations and structural rearrangements in cancer-associated genes.

The panel, which currently covers 468 genes, has allowed a large number of patients to enroll in clinical trials of targeted treatments, according to a study published by Berger and colleagues earlier this year based on the results from sequencing around 10,000 patients. The MSKCC team found that around a third of these patients harbored actionable mutations and 11 percent of patients participated in a genomically matched clinical trial based on their results.

Since then, the MSKCC team has profiled a total of 20,000 patients with the panel. Dr. Berger discusses lessons learned from this implementation process, including:

  • Considerations in assay design
  • Challenges in large-scale implementation
  • Integration with informatics systems
  • Assessment of clinical utility
  • Opportunities for clinical, translational, and basic research

Dr. Nevenka Dimitrova discusses how the Philips IntelliSpace Genomics platform addresses the challenges of implementing molecular profiling panels at healthcare systems with integrated clinical-genomic data, up-to-date variant interpretation and seamless workflow for precision oncology.

Genome Webinar

Medical Director, Molecular Oncology Diagnostics Lab
The Ottawa Hospital

This webinar demonstrates a new approach that combines precise FFPE tumor isolation with extraction-free DNA/RNA library preparation to minimize material losses and reduce the amount of tissue input required for NGS analysis.

The need to process small quantities of solid tumor specimens is increasing as early detection strategies become more effective and less invasive biopsy strategies are adopted. Moreover, the rapidly changing landscape of molecular testing points towards a need for minimizing sample input and preservation of sample for future testing. Processing small areas of dissected tumor can be challenging as traditional manual macrodissection and purification methods include multiple steps during which material can be lost.

In this webinar, Bryan Lo, Medical Director of the Molecular Oncology Diagnostics Lab at the Ottawa Hospital, presents a new approach that combines automated tissue dissection with NGS library prepared directly from fragments of dissected tissue.

Dr. Lo discusses a study that demonstrated that gene expression profiling of pancreatic cancer and precursor lesions extracted by automated tissue dissection system yielded highly correlated data across tissue samples. Furthermore, mutation screening of dissected tissue fragments from melanoma and colorectal cancer showed high correlation between libraries prepared from an extraction-free method vs extracted DNA.

Taken together, these findings demonstrate that an automated tissue dissection approach joined with extraction-free library preparation can help efficiently process extremely small samples that are otherwise too challenging for standard NGS analysis.

Viewers of this webinar will learn the following:

  • Current challenges with isolating precise tumor areas of interest from FFPE tissue samples
  • How a high-performance, automated tissue dissection system can extract challenging tumor tissue fragments precisely and consistently
  • How to subsequently prepare NGS libraries using extraction-free methods to further reduce the risk of sample loss
Genome Webinar

Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center  

Associate Director, Oncology Product Management, Thermo Fisher Scientific 

This webinar discusses how next-generation sequencing (NGS) can help clinical research labs and pathologists save time, money, and samples compared to single-analyte oncology research assays.

Recent studies estimate that almost 73 percent of cancer treatments in the pipeline may need a genomic biomarker in the next few years. As the list of genomic biomarkers relevant to clinical oncology keeps growing, the ability to detect mutations across hundreds of targets in a rapid, cost-efficient fashion helps pathology research laboratories conserve samples by reducing the need for sequential, single-analyte assays. NGS panels have revolutionized the field of cancer genomics by enabling pathologists and clinical researchers to analyze mutations across multiple genes, in a single assay.

For clinical research or pathology laboratories that are considering adopting NGS in house, it’s important that the chosen solutions are compatible with challenging sample types (such as fine needle aspirates and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples), have an automated wet-lab workflow, and offer plug-and-play bioinformatics capabilities.

During this webinar, Dr. Navid Sadri of the University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center provides an overview of why his pathology lab adopted NGS and how it is being implemented for clinical research. He provides some examples of how NGS helped identify different mutation types and provides relevant results with limited sample input and a rapid turnaround time.

Thereafter, Dr. Jody McIntyre of Thermo Fisher Scientific shows how Oncomine KnowledgeBase Reporter can help pathologists and clinical researchers link cancer variants to labels, guidelines and clinical trials, and generate an easy-to-interpret report in a few simple steps.

Genome Webinar

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School

Chief Technology Officer, Philips Genomics 

This webinar provides an overview of how liquid biopsies can be integrated into lung cancer care.

Genotyping of plasma cell-free DNA is rapidly changing the management approach for genotype-defined lung cancers. Widely available assays now have the ability to noninvasively identify driver mutations in cfDNA, monitor response to therapy, and characterize emerging resistance. However, such liquid biopsies also have clear limitations and existing assays are unlikely to replace tumor biopsies completely.

In this webinar, Geoffrey Oxnard of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute discusses an optimal approach for integrating liquid biopsies into lung cancer care, while also providing his outlook on how liquid biopsies may become a routine part of lung cancer treatment in the years ahead. 

Dr. Dimitrova discusses how the Philips IntelliSpace Genomics platform brings data from liquid biopsies (and other NGS tests) alongside disease histology and patient phenotype for a complete clinical picture for clinical decision making.

Genome Webinar

 Associate Chair, Surgical Research and Associate Professor of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine 

This webinar is the last in a four-part series highlighting real-world examples of how some lab directors are bringing validated next-generation sequencing-based tests to the clinic.

If you are a clinical laboratory that is currently running or about to begin offering NGS-based clinical genomics testing and want to know how other labs have addressed specific validation and daily implementation challenges, this webinar series is for you!

Labs looking to implement NGS diagnostics face a number of regulatory challenges. These tests currently fall under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment guidelines as laboratory developed tests and lack specific validation guidelines and global performance standards. Moreover, these assays feature complex workflows comprised of hardware, wetware, and software from multiple vendors assembled — far different from more standardized approaches that fall under the Food and Drug Administration's guidelines for in vitro diagnostics.

During this webinar, Tony Godfrey of the Boston University School of Medicine discusses how his lab is developing and validating clinical circulating tumor DNA assays. 

Sponsored by
Genome Webinar

CEO, Director & Co-Founder,
Clinical Genomics

Associate Director, New Product Quality Assurance,
Qiagen

This online seminar provides an overview of the use of liquid biopsies for cancer recurrence monitoring with a particular focus on colorectal cancer.

Analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has the potential to improve detection and monitoring of cancers in order to significantly impact patient outcomes. This is especially important for cancers with a high rate of recurrence, such as colorectal cancer, where between 30 percent and 40 percent of cases recur. However, the only currently available monitoring blood test misses 74 percent of resectable recurrences.

In this webinar, Dr. Lawrence LaPointe, CEO of Clinical Genomics, discusses how his team is working with Qiagen to develop a ctDNA test for colorectal cancer recurrence monitoring.

Additionally, Dr. Martin Horlitz briefly shares how Qiagen's ctDNA extraction chemistries are compliant with ISO and IVD quality guidelines.

Sponsored by
Genome Webinar

Former VP, Genomics R&D and Operations, BioReference Laboratories 

This webinar is the third in a four-part series highlighting real-world examples of how some lab directors are bringing validated next-generation sequencing-based tests to the clinic.

If you are a clinical laboratory that is currently running or about to begin offering NGS-based clinical genomics testing and want to know how other labs have addressed specific validation and daily implementation challenges, this webinar series is for you!

Labs looking to implement NGS diagnostics face a number of regulatory challenges. These tests currently fall under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment guidelines as laboratory developed tests and lack specific validation guidelines and global performance standards. Moreover, these assays feature complex workflows comprised of hardware, wetware, and software from multiple vendors assembled — far different from more standardized approaches that fall under the Food and Drug Administration's guidelines for in vitro diagnostics.

In this webinar, Robert Daber, formerly of BioReference Laboratory, discusses how labs can establish laboratory QC systems to comply with CAP, CLIA, and state regulatory guidelines. 

Sponsored by
Genome Webinar

Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center 

This webinar is the second in a four-part series highlighting real-world examples of how some lab directors are bringing validated next-generation sequencing-based tests to the clinic.

If you are a clinical laboratory that is currently running or about to begin offering NGS-based clinical genomics testing and want to know how other labs have addressed specific validation and daily implementation challenges, this webinar series is for you!

Labs looking to implement NGS diagnostics face a number of regulatory challenges. These tests currently fall under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment guidelines as laboratory developed tests and lack specific validation guidelines and global performance standards. Moreover, these assays feature complex workflows comprised of hardware, wetware, and software from multiple vendors assembled — far different from more standardized approaches that fall under the Food and Drug Administration's guidelines for in vitro diagnostics.

In this webinar, Gregory J. Tsongalis of Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center discusses how his lab developed and validated a cancer hotspot assay. 

Sponsored by
Genome Webinar

Principal, M.D, JD Consulting

Medical Director, Molecular Genetics and Genomics, ARUP Laboratories

Director of Laboratory Science, Palmetto GBA

Our roundtable of industry experts provide an overview of the current regulatory landscape for clinical genomics tests. The panelists discuss how clinical labs can and should ensure the analytical and clinical validity of their tests amid an uncertain regulatory climate. 

*This webinar is part 1 of 4 - Catalyzing Implementation of NGS-based Tests: A Webinar Series 

Sponsored by
Genome Webinar

Director, Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Lifelabs 

This webinar discusses a partnership model for noninvasive prenatal testing that enabled LifeLabs Genetics, a genetic testing lab based in Toronto, Ontario, to implement NIPT in house.

LifeLabs implemented on-site testing of the Natera Panorama test service in October 2015 in Toronto, where funding is provided for chromosome aneuploidy testing under selected high-risk criteria set out by the Ontario Ministry for Health and Long-Term Care. Patients have the option of self-pay if they do not meet risk criteria. On-site testing capacity includes microdeletions as of July 2016.

In this webinar, Ronald Carter, Director of the Molecular Genetics Laboratory at LifeLabs, shares how licensing Natera’s technology permitted a rapid and seamless transition to in-house testing and enhanced the implementation of indigenous NIPT test capacity. Dr. Carter outlines a detailed analyses of laboratory test results showing that the performance of the LifeLabs partner laboratory is equivalent to the reference testing provided by Natera in California.

Dr. Carter also outlines the sequence of transfer of test capacity, describes the operational requirements for partnering, and reviews the impact of NIPT funded services on the provision of prenatal care services in Ontario. Analysis of all clinical outcomes from NIPT services provided in Ontario will be used to guide future development of guidelines for care.

Sponsored by
Genome Webinar

Executive Director, Clinical Genomics, Genoptix

Field Application Scientist, Clinical Applications Division, Agilent Technologies

This webinar provides specific use cases from a molecular pathology lab demonstrating how an automated bioinformatics pipeline can improve somatic variant assessment and reporting.

Next-generation sequencing of tumor samples is becoming increasingly common in the molecular pathology setting, but the adoption of this technology brings challenges in data management and clinical interpretation, and requires bioinformatics tools to analyze, interpret, and database the large number of variants originating from NGS assays. In a high-throughput context, the delivery of actionable results from NGS data needs to be clinically robust (informed, traceable and reproducible). Moreover, in a cancer diagnostics setting, fast turnaround times are essential for patient care.

In this online seminar, Matthew J. McGinniss, Executive Director of Clinical Genomics at cancer diagnostics firm Genoptix, shares how his team validated an automated pipeline for somatic variant assessment and reporting in a high-throughput diagnostic setting. This pipeline supports the interpretation of genomic alterations including copy number variants and translocations and allows clinical molecular geneticists and molecular pathologists to provide quality clinical laboratory services to oncologists, pathologists, and clinicians. To conclude, Dr. McGinniss shares some clinical use cases demonstrating the variant assessment pipeline.

Sponsored by
November 03, 2016
Sponsored by
BioFire Diagnostics

Molecular Syndromic Testing in the ER: Assessing the Impact on Pediatric Care

Genome Webinar

Director, Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles,
Assistant Professor, Clinical Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California

This webinar covers an ongoing study to assess whether a rapid PCR-based gastrointestinal panel can improve health outcomes in the emergency room setting. 

The FilmArray Gastrointestinal Panel tests for identification of 22 different pathogens, including bacteria, parasites, and viruses from stool specimens in Cary Blair transport media. In this webinar, Jennifer Dien Bard from Children’s Hospital Los Angeles discusses how the FilmArray GI Panel affects patient outcomes for children with gastroenteritis presenting to emergency departments.

BioFire’s FilmArray® System uses syndromic testing to identify infectious diseases and is used in combination with assay-specific reagent panels. The system combines a broad grouping of probable pathogenic causes into a single, rapid test. This allows physicians to easily choose the right test, the first time. Requiring only two minutes of hands-on time, the FilmArray has a turnaround time of about an hour.

Dr. Dien Bard discusses ongoing work to assess whether this rapid turnaround time allows clinicians to more rapidly diagnose GI illness and recommend the appropriate therapy. 

Sponsored by
Genome Webinar

Clinical Director, Center for Personalized Diagnostics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

Genomics Technologist, Center for Personalized Diagnostics, University of Pennsylvania Health System

Bioinformatics Specialist
Penn Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Health System

During this webinar, speakers from the Center for Personalized Diagnostics at Penn Medicine discuss the design and technical validation of a custom next-generation sequencing panel to detect mutations in a wide array of tumor types.

Next-generation sequencing of tumor-derived DNA has revolutionized clinical cancer genomic diagnostics by directing molecularly targeted therapies. The accurate detection of mutations at low allele frequencies is essential for wider adoption of this approach due to high levels of stroma and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes diluting the detectable alterations.

The Center for Personalized Diagnostics began clinical NGS of solid tumors in 2013 using a 47-gene panel covering clinically relevant genes and hotspots. This was an early success with over 3,500 solid tumors sequenced in the laboratory over three and a half years.

However, the demand to increase gene content and to detect mutations in a wider array of tumor types led the team to explore molecular barcoding to bioinformatically eliminate duplicate reads and detect variants at lower allele frequencies. The team developed a custom 153 gene Agilent HaloPlexHS NGS panel to address this need. Dr. Jennifer Morrissette and her colleague Karthik Ganapathy share details of this work and discuss key considerations for the design, technical validation, and performance of this panel. Ashkan Bigdeli, an informaticist in the CPD demonstrates that in addition to Agilent’s SureCall software, a lab can choose to write a custom script for the analysis of HaloPlexHS NGS data.

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