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In a study, the diagnostic and delivery capsules remained in the GI tract of pigs for more than a month and transmitted wireless temperature signals.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology spinout has created a new class of activity sensors that query the body and report back clinically relevant information.

Some researchers believe that the use of microfluidics in the analysis of exosomes will help clinicians overcome the problem of heterogeneity in cancer cells.

The funding will be directed at conducting clinical trials for its technology based on activity sensors to detect human diseases and monitor drug responses.

The partnership will enable the design, development, and manufacture of a test to rapidly detect dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika viruses. 

The researchers have prospectively validated a disposable cartridge-based microfluidic assay by obtaining results using fine-needle aspirates in 40 patients.

Inspired by the electronic breadboards used to prototype electronic devices, the system is meant to enable flexible and inexpensive design of clinical tests.

The device being developed will interpret the scattered patterns of light that has passed through the body to enable cellular-level imaging and will compete with biopsies and blood tests.

One firm, Exosome Diagnostics, is working to streamline payor coverage for a commercial test, and researchers are simultaneously developing promising ways to isolate exosomes.

A research collaboration involving several universities has yielded a technique that they said isolates exosomes from biological samples more effectively than incumbent methods.

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