Close Menu

Mayo Clinic

Exact Sciences and the Mayo Clinic are working to develop a blood test for pancreatic cancer that might be able to diagnose patients with early-stage disease.

With 10,000 of Mayo's patients now sequenced for 77 genes, a subset of this information is being used to inform care while the bulk of the data is spurring research projects.

As the circle of doctors ordering drug testing expands, labs find themselves more involved in advisory and interpretive roles that go beyond running assays.

The two organizations will first focus on developing and validating Breath Diagnostics' OneBreath platform for lung cancer.

The test will leverage next-generation sequencing to sequence PCR amplicons of the UL54 and UL97 genes in which drug resistance with CMV has been associated.

The Finnish diagnostics company is working to expand US and European sales of its ceramide lipid-based cardiovascular risk assessment assay, CERT.

Changes in physician behavior around monitoring patient response to therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is increasing demand for clinical testing of these drugs.

The partners anticipate developing tests that analyze clusters of biomarkers to detect cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, liver cancer, and other diseases.

Mayo's diagnostic tests do not infringe upon Athena Diagnostics' patent because they use standard methods and involve "natural law," the court ruled.

Abbott CEO Miles White is bullish on the firm's Alinity systems, while Quest and LabCorp see acquisitions as the likely result of further PAMA-related cuts.

Pages