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Johns Hopkins

Thrive Earlier Detection is banking on targeted detection of frequent cancer mutations, coupled with protein markers, while competitors turn to genome-wide approaches.

The company is commercializing a method developed by researchers at Johns Hopkins that detects cancer with high specificity from a blood sample.

The company received support from a Johns Hopkins University center focused on point-of-care device development for sexually transmitted infections.

At the AGBT meeting last night, Johns Hopkins researcher Joshua Cohen said that the partners are looking to recruit 50,000 healthy individuals for the study.

The JHU technology leverages an epigenetic biomarker panel and a sponge-on-a-string collection device, as well as a PCR-based method, to detect Barrett's esophagus.

The device can process high-volume sputum samples for PCR-based Mycobacterium tuberculosis detection at smear-negative, culture-positive levels.

A diverse group of researchers and diagnostic industry participants has collaborated to produce two papers that describe and critique Lyme disease testing technologies.

Its platform is being developed for several medical conditions using separate modules to measure cells, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and small molecules.

Over several months, members of the Coalition to Improve Diagnosis identified initial obstacles they believe impede diagnostic accuracy.

Speakers at the Next Generation Dx Summit described how lateral flow test technologies are evolving to meet POC testing challenges.

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