pancreatic cancer

Researchers affiliated with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network found that treatment based on patient molecular profiles improved progression-free survival.

The Swedish molecular diagnostics firm will use the proceeds, in part, to fund the planned launch of its Immray PanCan-d assay for detecting pancreatic cancer.

The company will work with medical faculties of the universities of Greifswald and Rostock to develop Dx tools for personalized, immune-based treatments.

BGI will study pancreatic cancer with a group at Johns Hopkins and develop a diagnostic test for preterm birth detection with Mount Sinai Hospital researchers.  

Three vendors applied their variant calling and interpretation pipelines to the same tumor NGS panel data and came up with overlapping but different results.

Over the next three years, Immunovia and its partners will use the firm's Immray PanCan-d assay to screen 6,000 diabetes patients for pancreatic cancer.

One firm, Exosome Diagnostics, is working to streamline payor coverage for a commercial test, and researchers are simultaneously developing promising ways to isolate exosomes.

Given the high yield of miRNA markers they were able to isolate, the researchers believe the approach could be commercialized for routine cancer testing.

The team found that telomere fusions in pancreatic cells can act as potential predictive biomarkers for invasive cancer and high grade dysplasia in patients.

The test has already shown in large retrospective clinical studies that it can achieve an accuracy of 96 percent for early stage detection, according to Immunovia's CEO.

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