Close Menu

NEW YORK (360Dx) – A group of researchers led by the University of Michigan has developed a wearable device that can continually collect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in an individual's bloodstream and monitor the amount of cancer cells over time in the person.

While only tested in canine models at this point, the researchers believe that clinicians could potentially use the microfluidic chip-based system attached to a vein to detect cases of cancer and track the number of cancer cells in patients with minimal residual disease and relapse.

Get the full story with
360Dx Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

360Dx Premium gives you:
✔ Full site access
✔ Interest-based email alerts
✔ Access to archives

Never miss another important industry story.

Try 360Dx Premium now.

You may already have institutional access!

Check if I qualify.

Already a 360Dx or GenomeWeb Premium member?
Login Now.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Register for Free Content
You can still register for access to our free content.
Oct
24

This webinar will tell the story of Versiti’s journey in transforming genetic testing from a manual to a digitized process. It will include detail on how the organization succeeded, pain points along the way, a novel approach to variant assessment, and future plans for the program.

Nov
14
Sponsored by
Qiagen

This webinar will discuss some of the issues laboratories face when transitioning to next-generation sequencing, and the key features to be considered for a successful implementation in routine testing.

Dec
02
Sponsored by
Sophia Genetics

This webinar will discuss how Moffitt Cancer Center  has implemented a new capture-based application to accurately assess myeloid malignancies   by detecting complex variants in challenging genes  in a single experiment.