Close Menu

patent infringement

Natera sued Progenity in June but the firm said its Innatal cell-free DNA noninvasive prenatal test does not infringe any of Natera's six patents.

The suit comes shortly after Progenity filed for an initial public offering in which it is seeking to raise up to $122.6 million.

In its complaint, the Maryland-based company claimed that Natera infringes two of its patents, both titled "Methods for detection of genetic disorders."

The company has added three recently issued patents to the suit, filed Jan. 27, all covering methods for amplifying and sequencing nucleic acids.

The plaintiffs allege that TAI's heart transplant rejection test MyTAIHeart infringes on their patent for the non-invasive diagnosis of graft rejection.

The company's original lawsuit, filed last March, accused Natera of infringing on two patents it holds in conjunction with Stanford University.

BioMérieux had alleged infringement of two of its patents associated with nucleotide sequences to detect HIV-1 subtypes. 

Natera alleged that certain cell-free DNA-based oncology products sold by Archer Dx infringe its US Patent 10,538,814, which was issued earlier this month.

The decision means the ruling by an appeals court that Mayo did not infringe on Athena's patent on a method of diagnosing myasthenia gravis will stand.

The patent, which was awarded Jan. 7, covers cell-free DNA-based diagnostic methods, including those used in transplant medicine.

Pages