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Labrador Diagnostics, a firm controlled by an investment group that acquired Theranos' IP, alleged BioFire's FilmArray products infringe two patents.

The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit sent the case, which had been thrown out in December 2018, back to the trial court.

The company's original lawsuit, filed last March, accused Natera of infringing on two patents it holds in conjunction with Stanford University.

BioMérieux had alleged infringement of two of its patents associated with nucleotide sequences to detect HIV-1 subtypes. 

CareDx first sued Natera in April 2019, accusing the company of trying to mislead patients and clinicians about the superiority of its Prospera transplant test.

Following a lengthy discovery period, the lab is asking a South Carolina federal district court to find in its favor and decide that its negligence did not result in the death of Williams' son.

A pair of lawyers familiar with the case said that while ACLA might not win the legal battle, its lawsuit could aid efforts to get a legal fix to the law.

The decision means the ruling by an appeals court that Mayo did not infringe on Athena's patent on a method of diagnosing myasthenia gravis will stand.

The patent, which was awarded Jan. 7, covers cell-free DNA-based diagnostic methods, including those used in transplant medicine.

The magistrate did recommend that the court dismiss two counts made against Natera with respect to trademark disparagement and unfair trade practices.

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